Photography

Thunder

The Japanese experimental visual artist Takashi Ito’s 1982 short film Thunder tests two extremes of the fairly conventional medium of film. A five minute pulsing odyssey through an industrial architectural network, fueled by long exposure light drawings and a mechanical score that perverts both voice and glass samples, Thunder is maximal in its approach to providing audiovisual information, while boldly displaying a lack of kinetic cohesion. The entirety of the film consists of sequenced photographs, relying on the phenomenon of persistence of vision to enable the viewer to “perceive motion smoothly unfold over time.”

Compressionism

6206912899_5645817a99.jpgPart photography, part performance art filtered through an algorithmic structure, Nathaniel Stern's Compressionism uses a document scanner as the tool of choice, which takes on the dual roles of paintbrush and camera: as the scanner bulb moves along its path, the artist follows his own path hovering over various objects and textures. Sometimes linearly, sometimes erratically, he moves according to his own performative instincts. With this kinetic approach, Stern bridges a certain gap between his body and the end result.