neon

Aporia

640x516x2.jpg?auth=1ed24f8a11f133b7e5c46Aporia is a collection of installations by South Korean artist Lee Jung. Each of the installations consist of a sentence or phrase spelled out in neon against an empty, natural background. The word "aporia" comes from a Greek word meaning "dead end street" and the Oxford English Dictionary defines it as: "An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory." The name of the piece combined with the specific matter phrases suggests the artist's complex, if not conflicted, thoughts about the concept of love.

Force of Nature

tumblr_nock79w2XF1qav3uso2_r1_540.gif?zoIn April 2015, Nike released its revolutionary kinetic digital art project, Force of Nature, for the Nike Innovation Summit at Truman Brewery in London. The work was created in collaboration with Field, a London-based design studio. By stepping onto a treadmill and beginning to create movement, the participating runner is presented with a fluctuating shower of stunning, multicolored sparks, similar to an energy “mirror” of themselves, created by the movement put forth by him or her on the treadmill. The flux of lights is meant to imitate the runner’s motion and turn the human body into a digital art piece. [1]. The work recalls earlier artworks, including Nancy Paterson's Bicycle TV (1989) and Jeffery Shaw's Legible City (1989-91), both of which used a bicycle as the interface by which the user's activity generates an animated video environment.