Exhibitions, Institutions, Communities, Collaborations

r/place

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o4oku48qk9py.pngr/place (pronounced "ar slash place" or simply just "place") is a collaborative art project created by the community of the website Reddit.com in April of 2017. r/place was a grid of one million pixels (1000×1000) that was initially completely white. Anyone with a reddit account could visit http://www.reddit.com/r/place between the first and third of April of 2017. Once there, users could pick a color, and place a single pixel of the chosen color anywhere on the grid, including pixels that other users had already filled in. Users were allowed to place additional pixels five to twenty minutes after each pixel they placed. The page still exists, however users can no longer participate in the project and instead the subreddit is now dedicated to people simply talking about r/place.

Under

Martina-Amarti.jpg?itok=MA0uBTNz&timestaMartina Amati is a London-based artist and filmmaker that has worked with water as one of her main subjects. She developed the installation film “Under” with Kevin Fong, a scientist and a physiology professor at University College London.(1) She has various shots of people floating in water. She uses low frequency echoing sounds to create stability in the background and also to help enhance the spatial temporal depth of the film.(2) Amati uses the varying tones of blue to evoke a sense of calmness that amalgamates with both the ambient and manufactured sounds to reflect off each other a more profound sensation of surreal peace.

In Order to Control

“What is it to be free? Are you free at all? These are just some of the questions asked to the participants in the interactive installation created by Nota Bene, an Istanbul-based creative studio.  The artwork In Order to Control features a continuous loop of digital text sprawled across the floor, littered with moral and ethical questions such as, “Everything that’s legal is not always fair,” and “Everything that’s fair is not always legal.”[2]  As spectators step over the sea of Nota Bene’s ethos, their silhouette on the wall takes to life and is transposed with the scrolling typography.

Profession- Animal Communicator

Communication and telepathy with non-human animals is a subject that has not been extensively researched, but has sparked curiosity in humans. Other animals bring us a wealth of joy and fascination, making it no surprise that alternate ways of communication with them are being developed and explored, due to humans not being able to directly understand non-human animal vocals. Rebecca Loyche’s Profession-Animal Communicator is an experimental video that features overlaid clips of various species of animals including pets as well as wild animals, with a recorded interview from a professional communicator “with over twenty years of experience, estimating that she has done over twenty-four thousand consultations to date.” [1]

Polarseeds

THE POLARSEEDS PROJECT: COMMUNICATING GREENLAND MELTING THROUGH VISUALIZATION AND SONIFICATION.  Marco Tedesco, associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at the City College of New York, noted the beauty of climate science, such as flooding, cloud structure, and melting ice. To make climate science more attractive, he and his colleagues have jointly developed a research project called "Polarseeds" to present the diverse art of climate science through visual arts, music, and games.

Deep Sleep Trawler

artworks-000078803702-0cvqgl-t500x500.jpAs the digital artist in residence at Forth Valley Royal Hospital in Scotland, sound artist Mark Vernon created a series of four sound art pieces, called "Bedside Radio," designed to be played over the hospital's radio station, Radio Royal. The third of these pieces, Deep Sleep Trawler, was created in 2012 "with the intention of creating a database or 'dream bank' to provide sleep deprived hospital patients with the opportunity of sharing someone else's dreams."

Song of the Phenomena

Chris Henschke is an Australian digital artist who studies scientific concepts like physics, sound and light, and other phenomena. He and Mark Boland, an Australian Synchrotron physicist, collaborated on an exhibit called "Song of the Phenomena", which was displayed in the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology Gallery in 2016. "Song of the Phenomena" includes a machine that is activated by the atomic radiating particles emitting from decomposing fruit and converted into sound. The machine was once used to calibrate radiation oncology treatments.

CAPSID

London-based artist John Walter spent three years studying with Greg Towers at UCL to better understand the interactions between a virus and its host, specifically HIV-1 and the effect of AIDS on the human body's immune system. His meticulous research is shown in his new multimedia project CAPSID, featuring a short film titled A Virus Walks Into a Bar, which pulls the "bar" motif of British soap operas to present an analogous tale of how HIV enters human cells and destroys them from within. Through this film – as well as paintings and installations – Walter's work not only uncovers new ways of expressing how HIV behaves, but presents his findings in a way that the non-scientifically-inclined can understand.

Digital Instru-Mentation: Red Forest and Emblems of Ascension

Campbell%20Red%20Forest%202015%20detail.Digital art, as in the work of Robert Campbell (Red Forest, detail) and NoiseFold is achieving the plasticity of clay, paint on canvas, or even analog electronics. Several Currents 2015 participants have developed, or cobbled together, computer based tools which provide the robustness needed to dig in, explore, and experiment with contemporary new media materials and techniques. It's much like the shift from the brush of a Mannerist painter to the sponge of a Max Ernst frottage.Progress in the flexibility and robustness of digital instruments allow them to be treated as plastic media which may lead to fully collaborative human/machine systems. We can start to imagine an actual collaboration between humans and machines where, rather than participating in a one-way struggle, each contribute what they do best in a two-way dialog. And once these collaborative systems are established, their collective behavior will become more interesting than any particular 'finished work'.

Two Women

stacks-image-34fddf8.jpgTwo women: one is young, angelic, billowing and dream like; the other alternates between the fetal position and the floating corpse pose. Side by side, the wood framed vessels into which the the images are projected and submerged in water, read as both boat and coffin. Like flowers dropped from the installation’s peeling wallpaper or the Chinese screens described by the narrator as she recounts a dream that turns into a nightmare, the water is the source of life of death. In Two Women, the gasping for air is visceral as the older woman contorts her body and I, the witness, listen to her story in Korean, read it in English and hear the stylus punctuate it into fabric as Morse code, the universal language associated with distress.

A Sound Garden

A Sound Garden, by Douglas Hollis, is an "aeolean" sound sculpture comprised of 12 tower-like structures. An aeolean instrument is one that wind-driven, a reference to Aeolus, the Greek god of wind. The structures contain pipes that generate a wide variety of sounds, depending on wind speed and direction [2]. As this area is subject to frequent winds of varying intensity, A Sound Garden the visitor will almost always hear it in action and may be treated to a dynamic wind-driven concert as the sounds respond to changes in the winds. A Sound Garden is also notable as the inspiration for the eponymous Seattle grunge band, Soundgarden.

Net Blow-Up

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IMG2126.jpgThe Net Blow-Up exhibit, by croatian-austrian design collective Numen/For Use, is a highly interactive sculpture evoking nostalgia from the bouncy-castles of our youth.  “Although the history of art has cultishly celebrated the individual genius, the field increasingly has recognized the importance of exhibitions, institutions and communities in shaping the production, reception and historical contextualization of art.” [1] This collaborative effort is humble, playful and simple in a way that is a necessary counterpoint to the pretentiousness that feeds the majority of modern art.  I do not intend to belittle the cutting edge; I just mean that without exhibits like Net Blow-Up the world of art would be a lot less fun.

A Bell for Every Minute

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A Bell for Every Minute is a sound installation by artist Stephen Vitiello, located on the High Line in New York City. Vitiello recorded 59 bells from all over New York City. These include landmark bells such New York Stock Exchange bell, the Dreamland Bell, the United Nation’s Peace Bell, and more common, everyday bells such as bike bells, diner bells, and church bells. Vitiello placed speakers throughout the 14th Street Passage, a tunnel between West 13th and West 14th Streets. Each minute, a bell rings from the speakers. At the top of each hour, all of the different bells ring at once in a chorus that fills the space.

Hello World! Or: How I Learned to Stop Listening and Love the Noise

Hello World! is a large-scale audio visual installation comprised of thousands of unique video diaries gathered from the internet. The project is a meditation on the contemporary plight of democratic, participative media and the fundamental human desire to be heard. Hello World is the first program that is traditionally taught in any programming language, and How I Learned to Stop Listening and Love the Noise references the Stanley Kubrick film Dr. Strangelove.   The installation tries to capture the vast archive of one-person narratives that exist on the Internet and emphasize them as a collective whole rather than as individuals.

Sonic Water

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“Sonic Water,” by artists Sven Meyer and Kim Pörksen, is an interactive cymatic installation that explores the visualization of sound though water. The audience can walk up to a container of water, which is set atop speakers, and introduce their own input sound: voice, a song recording, or another sound source. The result of these sound vibrations is unique patterns in the water that are photographed from above. This exhibit is an interesting example of how feedback can create and alter a physical medium to visualize something so invisible as sound.

Electronic Peristyle

medium_Seawright%20Electronic%20PeristylThis interactive art installation or “reactive environment,” to use the artist’s term, was first shown at the William Nelson Rockhill Gallery of Art in Kansas City as part of the Magic Theater exhibition in 1968.  Developed with the assistance of Robert Moog, the pioneering inventor of electronic musical instruments, Electronic Peristyle employs digital circuits to control a sound synthesizer, fans, and lights.  Twelve electronic columns surround a transparent globe set on a cylindrical base.  Light beams emitted from the base, like spokes on a wheel, strike sensors on the columns.  By breaking the beams, the participator alters the sound, light patterns, and wind effects.

Mud Muse

This great construction of driller’s mud and sound-activated electronics to make it bubble and splash is the most totally bizarre and ‘concept-less’ piece in… Read More »Mud Muse

Skull

This is a STUB article please make edits and adjustments as suggested on Wikipedia to make it more robust.  Thanks! Skull Robert Lazzarini  … Read More »Skull

Dawn Burn

Lucier first emerged as a video artist in the early 1970s and is best known for her large-scale sculptural installations. With Dawn Burn she… Read More »Dawn Burn

Alma da Agua: A Fluid Water and Space Initiative

imagex769x603.jpg?isImage=1Alma da Agua (Water of the Soul) seeks to re-connect all Portuguese speaking contries. Taking water samples from the eight countries (Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guine-Bissau, Sao Tome e Principe, and East Timor), Artists Richard Clar and Dinis Afonso Ribeiro intend to send the water samples into space inside a liquid mixing apparatus (shown above). The idea is to expose the water to low-gravity and mix the waters in a symbolic way and in a neutral environment.

scale

scale is an interspecies art project: an audience-interactive installation that involves nocturnal electric fish from the Amazon River Basin. Twelve different species of these fish… Read More »scale

Reactable

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The Reactable was conceived as an instrument to bring back the expressive possibilities of traditional instruments to musicians who are working with new technologies. It uses… Read More »Reactable

A Bicycle Built for 2,000

website_header.pngBicycle Built For 2,000 is a collaborative artwork in the form of a song comprised of 2,088 voice recordings collected via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk web service. Workers were prompted to listen to a short sound clip, then record themselves imitating what they heard. The recorded sound clips were collected and organized into the original pattern.

Art Ticker

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“This sculpture displays the names of artists and indicates how fast they are rising or falling in the media.