Given Time

In Given Time, artist Nathaniel Stern utilizes different forms of media, but maintains his focus on the relationship between bodies and art. This this video installation, Stern created two avatars in Second Life who stand apart facing one another. Their location within the in-game world is never disclosed, but they do occupy virtual space somewhere. In physical space, the two avatars are projected onto screens opposite one another in the gallery, as in Second Life. Viewers can approach the two virtual performers, while they hover as video projections, forever staring at one another. These representational characters are in fact, nobody. They exist only in the virtual plane, yet they are brought into existence via light and electricity.

Compressionism

6206912899_5645817a99.jpgPart photography, part performance art filtered through an algorithmic structure, Nathaniel Stern's Compressionism uses a document scanner as the tool of choice, which takes on the dual roles of paintbrush and camera: as the scanner bulb moves along its path, the artist follows his own path hovering over various objects and textures. Sometimes linearly, sometimes erratically, he moves according to his own performative instincts. With this kinetic approach, Stern bridges a certain gap between his body and the end result.

Alma da Agua: A Fluid Water and Space Initiative

imagex989x775.jpgAlma da Agua (Water of the Soul) seeks to re-connect all Portuguese speaking contries. Taking water samples from the eight countries (Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guine-Bissau, Sao Tome e Principe, and East Timor), Artists Richard Clar and Dinis Afonso Ribeiro intend to send the water samples into space inside a liquid mixing apparatus (shown above). The idea is to expose the water to low-gravity and mix the waters in a symbolic way and in a neutral environment.

AH_Q

Ah_Q.jpgChinese new media artist Feng Mengbo has worked with iconic first person shooters Doom and Quake throughout his career. In Q3 (1999) Feng recorded footage of the game Quake III Arena and superimposed live action video of himself, toting a camera around the battlefield and interviewing contestants, over top. Feng expanded upon this idea in 2002's Q4U (a play on the common abbreviation for the game, Q3A) by completely reworking the game's code to replace all character models with a model of himself, bespecktacled and shirtless, with a gun in one hand and a video camera in the other. Feng's AH-Q, released in 2004 and pictured here, saw the addition of a dance pad used to control all the player character's motions.

The following video, produced by the Creator's Project, includes examples of Feng Mengbo's work and an interview with the artist.

Pages