Sound Bites City

Sound%20Bites%20City%202.jpgSound Bites City is a collection of sound art from 19 sound artists from around the world at the RMIT University in Australia.  Exhibited at the RMIT University Gallery, the sound art is played through speakers that are scattered around a round physical structure that culminates with a raised, faux, grassy knoll.  This space is called the Torus.   RMIT University describes the Torus as “an exciting circular structure that has been specially designed by architects, engineers and sound designers based in RMIT's SIAL unit to provide the best way to exhibit sound.”

Net Blow-Up


IMG2126.jpgThe Net Blow-Up exhibit, by croatian-austrian design collective Numen/For Use, is a highly interactive sculpture evoking nostalgia from the bouncy-castles of our youth.  “Although the history of art has cultishly celebrated the individual genius, the field increasingly has recognized the importance of exhibitions, institutions and communities in shaping the production, reception and historical contextualization of art.” [1] This collaborative effort is humble, playful and simple in a way that is a necessary counterpoint to the pretentiousness that feeds the majority of modern art.  I do not intend to belittle the cutting edge; I just mean that without exhibits like Net Blow-Up the world of art would be a lot less fun.

Mechanical Parts

 Mechanical Parts is a series of illustrations drawn by a robot programmed by artist Matthias Dörfelt. His machine, named 'Robo Fabers,' rolls across the paper and creates drawings autonomously, while adhering to a set of... interesting guidelines Dörfelt programmed it with. As he told Gizmodo, "basically [Robo Fabers] is doodling connectors—think of it as robot genitalia—as a first step of planing reproduction." The machine randomly arranges various permutations of components as specified by Dörfelt. Most noticeably, shapes clearly resembling hairy and shorn testicles, phalluses, sperm, holes, and eggs are are visible in the drawings pictured above.

A Bell for Every Minute

A Bell for Every Minute is a sound installation by artist Stephen Vitiello, located on the High Line in New York City. Vitiello recorded 59 bells from all over New York City. These include landmark bells such New York Stock Exchange bell, the Dreamland Bell, the United Nation’s Peace Bell, and more common, everyday bells such as bike bells, diner bells, and church bells. Vitiello placed speakers throughout the 14th Street Passage, a tunnel between West 13th and West 14th Streets. Each minute, a bell rings from the speakers. At the top of each hour, all of the different bells ring at once in a chorus that fills the space.

Polygon Playground

Polygon Playground is a 'dynamic lounge object,' incorporating 3D projection technologies and sensors to detect movement and proximity of people in the room. The physical structure is such that up to 40 people may climb, rest, or walk around it, while sensors cause the 'landscape' to continuously change as as long as there is human presence. Often the imagery responds to movements, so running across the top of the structure may cause it to highlight the participants footsteps. Other motifs include grids, filling with water, orbs or color that can be 'kicked' around, and various abstract color forms.

Trace

Bolygo’s take on the self portrait, Trace, is a 2008 sculptural device by the artist, which connects conventional ideas of sculpture, especially of the human form, to contemporary notions of topography and transcription. The piece involves a rotating cast of the artist's head traversed by an extension of a complex but completely mechanical device, which records depth onto a circular piece of paper rotating at the same rate as the head. The artist's own head is then transformed into a compelling topographical map of itself under rotation. The resulting image is noticeably a head, but a heavily distorted one, appearing almost like an image from a spirograph, an evolving concentric diagram of recorded depth.

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