light

Aporia

640x516x2.jpg?auth=1ed24f8a11f133b7e5c46Aporia is a collection of installations by South Korean artist Lee Jung. Each of the installations consist of a sentence or phrase spelled out in neon against an empty, natural background. The word "aporia" comes from a Greek word meaning "dead end street" and the Oxford English Dictionary defines it as: "An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory." The name of the piece combined with the specific matter phrases suggests the artist's complex, if not conflicted, thoughts about the concept of love.

Doubt

In Doubt, artist Carsten Höller challenges our perceptions of reality through coded sequences of light and spatio-temporal illusions. His goal was to blur the lines between spectator and performer within a work of art, while instilling a deep feeling of doubt inside us. The installation begins as a single hallway of light, which subsequently divides itself into two paths, each of which is individually illuminated by either yellow or green lights. Once a spectator chooses a path, they are presented with a multi-level maze of sorts, which combines different sequences of light projection with moments of darkness to challenge our perceptual framework.

Force of Nature

tumblr_nock79w2XF1qav3uso2_r1_540.gif?zoIn April 2015, Nike released its revolutionary kinetic digital art project, Force of Nature, for the Nike Innovation Summit at Truman Brewery in London. The work was created in collaboration with Field, a London-based design studio. By stepping onto a treadmill and beginning to create movement, the participating runner is presented with a fluctuating shower of stunning, multicolored sparks, similar to an energy “mirror” of themselves, created by the movement put forth by him or her on the treadmill. The flux of lights is meant to imitate the runner’s motion and turn the human body into a digital art piece. [1]. The work recalls earlier artworks, including Nancy Paterson's Bicycle TV (1989) and Jeffery Shaw's Legible City (1989-91), both of which used a bicycle as the interface by which the user's activity generates an animated video environment.

Vectorial Elevation: Relational Architecture 4

vectorialelevation_mexico_06.jpgRafael Lozano-Hemmer's>Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's Vectorial Elevation is "an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City’s Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city’s historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. These web pages were completely uncensored, allowing participants to leave a wide variety of messages, including love poems, football scores, Zapatista slogans and twenty-seven marriage proposals. In Mexico, the project attracted 800,000 participants from 89 countries over the course of its two-week duration."[1]

Catso Red

    Birçok sanatçı ışıklı yansıtmayı ağırlıksız uzamlar yaratmak için kullanırken, bu çalışmada Turrell, katı bir form… Leer más »Catso Red

Light Ballet

1959'da Otto Piene Işık Balesi işini yarattı. Bu işle 'elementlere' olan ilgisini açığa çıkarıyordu.

'' Elementle sadece  klasik Yunan'daki elementleri -ateş, su, hava ve toprak- değil aynı zamanda insan elementlerini, etki, tepki, müdehale ve katılımı da kastediyorum''[1]

Op Art exhibition'da (Frankfurt, 2007) sergilenen videosu

Moholy-Nagy’nin Light Space Modulator’ının izinden giden Piene, Light Ballet’in üç farklı biçimini yaptı. Archaic Ballet’de (1959) elektrik ışığı delikli mukavvadan geçiyordu. Mechanical Light Ballet’de (1960) izleyicilerin çalıştırdığı kollar ışıklı nesnelerin daha yavaş hareket etmesini sağlıyordu. Automatic Light Ballet’de elektrikle çalışan motorlar aynı etkiyi doğurmuştu.

Nocturnal Flow

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Erwin Redl’s large-scale light installation Nocturnal Flow presents itself as a sea of LEDs stretching from floor to ceiling of the University of Washington’s Allen Center. Composed of over 10,000 individual light units whose intensity varies through time, the grid-like work serves both to emphasize the verticality of the space in which it is housed, but also to accommodate a natural motion birthed from sterility. The use of environmentally-reponsive sensors also imbues the work with a streak of subjectivity, as it can be perceived in contrasting ways depending not only on angle of view, but also time of day or year.

77 Million Paintings

En 2009, Brian Eno – inventor de la música, productor discográfico y artista visual reconocido – fue invitado a Sydney para curar un proyecto llamado Luminoso, parte de Vivid Sydney, una fiesta pública única para «transformar la ciudad en un lienzo viviente espectacular de la música y la luz en y alrededor de la Sydney Opera House, The Rocks, Circular Quay y City Centre «. La belleza de la fiesta no sólo reside en la variedad de diferentes obras de arte y performances exhibidas durante el curso de Luminoso, sino también, de acuerdo con Eno, en el denominador común de los artistas combinados: la incapacidad de colocarlos en una categoría obvio. Afirmó que «[l] son personas que trabajan en los nuevos territorios, los lugares en el medio, los lugares apartados en los bordes. […] Algunos de ellos toman formas viejas y se infunden nueva vida, y se hacen nuevos otra vez, y otros inventan formas de arte que antes no existían”.

FLOW

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FLOW

 

FLOW

77 Million Paintings

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In 2009, Brian Eno projected 77 Million Paintings onto the distinctive white sails of the the Sydney Opera House (1973), the architectural landmark designed by architect Jorn Utzon and designated by UNESCO as a world heritage site in 2007. Through the use of self-generating software, 300 images hand-drawn by renowned artist/composer Brian Eno were randomly cut-up, the pieces rearranged and realigned in an endless variety of ways, hence the title of the trancelike projection.  Interwoven with the projected images was a soundtrack, creating “mesmerizing soundscape.» As Eno says, “by allowing ourselves to let go of the world that we have to be part of every day, and to surrender to another kind of world, we’re allowing imaginative processes to take place.”

Camera Lucida

Camera Lucida is an interactive “sonic observatory” that directly converts sound waves into light by employing a phenomenon called sonoluminescence. The project was conceived both as an artwork and as a musical instrument that allows its player to see and shape sounds while moving through space….

The project began as a speculative reverie on observing sound waves with the naked eye. The idea of using a gas that would luminesce when irradiated by sound converted into voltage was very appealing to us. However, as soon as we came upon the phenomenon of sonoluminescence, it became quite clear that we had struck virgin soil.

Vectorial Elevation: Relational Architecture 4

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s>Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Vectorial Elevation is «an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City’s Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city’s historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. These web pages were completely uncensored, allowing participants to leave a wide variety of messages, including love poems, football scores, Zapatista slogans and twenty-seven marriage proposals. In Mexico, the project attracted 800,000 participants from 89 countries over the course of its two-week duration.»[1]